Rare Earth Elements, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
REE Facts | HREE Facts | LREE Facts | Rare Metal Resource
LREE : 57 Lanthanum | 58 Cerium | 59 Praseodymium | 60 Neodymium | 61 Promethium | 62 Samarium | 63 Europium | 64 Gadolinium
HREE : 65 Terbium | 66 Dysprosium | 67 Holmium | 68 Erbium | 69 Thulium | 70 Ytterbium | 71 Lutetium | 39 Yttrium
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
The Light Rare Earth Element "Seeing Red" Europium
Tracy Weslosky, Editor, InvestorIntel
Source: REE Handbook

Europium, REE Collection, ProEdge Media Corp. Can you imagine watching television without the red and orange colours? The image would perhaps be no better than watching black and white. Thanks to the light rare earth element (LREE) europium the images on our televisions are vivid and vibrant. The world's first major producer of europium for the television industry was Molybdenum Corporation of America, also known as Molycorp.

Europium is also used to make trichromatic fluorescent lights that are reddish-orange and blue. Europium also helps to control the fission process in nuclear reactors by absorbing neutrons. In its most stealthy application europium is used as an anti-forgery chemical marker on the Euro and various other currencies.

Europium was discovered in 1890 by the French chemist Eugène-Anatole Demarçay who was the student of another French chemist named Paul E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran. Demarçay improved upon initial tests conducted by his teacher which led to the discovery of europium. Europium was named after the continent of Europe where it was discovered. Europium is the most reactive rare earth element. It is soft and silvery-white in colour. Europium oxide, also referred to as europia, can readily absorb moisture and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Resources of europium are largely contained in light rare earth element (LREE) enriched minerals. Europium occurs in the Earth's crust at an average concentration of 1 parts per million and it is primarily sourced from carbonatites and the LREE-mineral bastnäsite. Bastnäsite deposits in China and the United States constitute the largest percentage of the world's rare earth economic resources. Europium is also a constituent in the LREE-mineral monazite which is the second largest segment of rare earth resources.

Monazite deposits are located in Australia, Brazil, China, India, Malaysia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and the United States (Hedrick, 2010). Europium sourced from the LREE-mineral loparite is recovered from a large alkali igneous intrusion in Russia (Hedrick, Sinha, and Kosynkin, 1997). Europium is mined from a variety of ore minerals and deposits using various methods.

For more information on the light rare earth element europium, visit www.REEHandbook.com – the ultimate source for information on rare earth elements.

Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
InvestorIntel, Investors Intelligence REE Stocks Company Limited, REE Leaders Index REEHandbook, REE Elements
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
Featured Images
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
 
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
 
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
 
Europium, Light Rare Earth Elements, LREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel